The Dangers of Journalism in Mexico

The Dangers of Journalism in Mexico

On March 23rd, journalist Miroslava Breach was shot and murdered in the Northern Mexican State of Chihuahua, making her the third murdered Mexican journalist in March. Authorities found a note that said, “For being a loud-mouth”. This tragic incident has prompted Chihuahua’s governor Javier Corral to ask for federal aid to fight organized crime, stating that Chihuahua was not financially able to fight back these criminal parties.

According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, an American organization that fights for the protection of journalists around the world, thirty eight journalists have been killed in Mexico since 1992. Twenty eight of these murders were caused by crimes, a worrying statistic considering that Mexico does not have an ongoing war. Moreover, the statistics show an upward trend in the number of journalists killed per year, with the three journalists murdered in Mexico representing half of the total confirmed journalists killed around the world.

On the other hand, more liberal estimates from the International Federation of Journalists show that by 2015, 120 journalists had been murdered in Mexico alone, making it the most dangerous country in Latin America for journalists. Government officials have attempted to prevent more slaughters by forming a special prosecutor specifically for journalism and passing laws that guaranteed journalists protection. Sadly, these laws haven’t helped as Mexico is currently ranked as “Not Free” by Freedom House. These journalists that write about organized crime and political corruption are often targeted, and sometimes, murdered without any consequences for the criminals because of the inefficient justice system.

As the Miroslava Breach case gains public attention, government officials are looking for ways to fight back the organized crime that threatens these journalists.



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