Remembering the Mysterious Case of Alberto Nisman, Argentine Prosecutor

Remembering the Mysterious Case of Alberto Nisman, Argentine Prosecutor

On January 18, 2015, Alberto Nisman was found dead in his apartment with a single gunshot wound to his head just hours before he was going to accuse former president Cristina Kirchner and other politicians of covering up evidence regarding a terrorist attack in 1994.

The attack, known as the AMIA bombing, killed 84 people in the Jewish Center of Buenos Aires—Argentina’s capital. This attack is arguably one of the deadliest bombings in Latin American history.  Over twenty years later, however, the assailants have yet to be identified. In 2006, after the investigation gained notoriety for its controversiality, Alberto Nisman, the prosecutor in charge of the case, accused the Iranian government of co-orchestrating the attack with the guerilla militant group Hezbollah. Nisman went on to solicit international arrest warrants for five Iranian officials, effectively banning them from leaving the country.

Wreckage from the AMIA bombing in Argentina, 1994. via ascertainthetruth
Wreckage from the AMIA bombing in Argentina, 1994. via ascertainthetruth

Over the course of one of the biggest conspiracy cases in history, Nisman made enemies in high places. On January 14, 2015, he filed a criminal complaint against Argentinian President, Cristina Kirchner, and her Foreign Minister for allegedly protecting the assailants by burying evidence.  On January 18, however, 2015, (just a few) hours before Nisman was due to explain his allegations to congress, he was found dead.

The fact that he was found dead in his bathroom with a handgun next to his body led to speculations that Nisman had committed suicide. President Kirchner enforced the notion when she posted on her Facebook page regarding Nisman’s motives for suicide.

Nisman’s widow, Sandra Arroyo Salgado, however, had other theories regarding Nisman’s death, declaring that  “I have no doubt, that because of the way he was, his personality, he never would have taken his own life. (…) the very moment they told me that he had been found dead and that there was a gun at the scene, I knew that someone had killed him.”

Salgado was especially disgusted with the police department’s failure to preserve evidence at the scene. She launched her own investigation into her husband’s death. Looking through the photographs and videotapes of the autopsy, Salgado’s team unanimously concluded that the death could not have been accidental.

Nisman’s case entertains the possibility of collusion on an international level, and the lengths that a government will take to silence an individual before he exposes their secrets. Salgado stated that the authorities were “completely ignoring the fact that Alberto was discovered dead just four days after having accused the president of the country of nothing less serious than a possible cover-up of a terrorist attack that killed 85 people.”